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Mandatory Hotel Quarantine In Ireland – What are the Costs, Conditions & Countries Involved

woman confined to bedroom for work

Visitors from countries considered as ‘high risk’ are now required to pre-book mandatory hotel quarantine in Ireland.  

Mandatory hotel quarantine in Ireland is now required for arrivals from high risk countries, as well as people who fail to produce a negative PCR test on arrival. The booking portal is available to access here.
 

 

 
Passengers are required to pre-book accommodation in a designated hotel and have to pre-pay handsomely for the privilege. The Crowne Plaza Dublin Airport Hotel in Santry is the first hotel ready to accept visitors, but additional hotels from the Tifgo Hotel Group will be added as required.
 

 

 
The Tifco Hotel Group will provide ground transportation, security and wellbeing services, as well as providing meals to guests at the designated hotel. Guests will be transported from ports or airports to hotels on arrival.

hotel quarantine in Ireland - what is required

What visitors are required to use hotel quarantine in Ireland?

All arrivals from high risk counties, as well as those  who transited through a port or airport in the designated ‘high risk’ state in the 14 days prior to their arrival in Ireland, must enter mandatory hotel quarantine – this is regardless of nationality. Those who can not produce a negative PCR test are also required to quarantine in Ireland at a designated hotel. High risk countries currently are as follows, but this list is subject to change and will be updated here 

Andorra, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Aruba, Austria, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belgium, Bermuda, Bolivia, Bonaire, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Burundi, Canada, Cape Verde, Chile, Colombia, Curaçao, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equador, Eswatini, Ethiopia,  France, French Guinana, Guyana, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Kosovo, Kuwait, Lebanon, Lesotho, Luxembourg, Malawi, Mauritius, Moldova, Monaco, Montenegro, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, North Macedonia, Maldives, Oman, Pakistan, Palestine, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Puerto Rico, Qatar, Rwanda,  San Marino, Serbia, Seychelles, Sint Eustatius and Saba, Somalia, South Africa, Suriname, Turkey, Territory of the Wallis and Futuna Islands, Tanzania, United Arab Emirates, Ukraine, Uruguay, USA, Venezuela, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.

 

 

 

 

How much does hotel quarantine in Ireland cost?

 It is important to note that the passenger bears the total cost of mandatory hotel quarantine in Ireland.  Price for sole occupancy are €1,875 for 12 nights including three meals per day and services. Additional rate for one adult sharing a room is €625, means the total cost per couple is €2,500. Children sharing cost €360 per child (age 4-12), which equates to a cost of €3,220 for a family of four. Children up to 3 are free of charge. 
 

 

 

How long do I have to stay in mandatory hotel quarantine?

The mandatory period is 14 days, however, this can be reduced to 12 days if you receive a negative PCR test result after ten days. Guests are tested on arrival and again after 10 days.
 

 

 

What is included in hotel quarantine in Ireland, and what freedom have passengers got?

hotel facilities during hotel quarantine in Ireland

The hotel will deliver three meals per day (from hotel menu) directly to the passengers door. Additional food and beverages can be purchased separately. WiFi and in-room movies are included in the cost of hotel quarantine in Ireland. Guests will have access to an designated outdoor area up to three times per day for 15 minutes – these times need to be pre-booked and will be overseen by security personnel.

If people try to leave hotel quarantine in Ireland they are subject to a €2000 fine and / or a prison sentence up to 1 month. The Irish Defence Forces will be onsite to enforce compliance.
 

 

 

Who is exempt from mandatory hotel quarantine in Ireland? 

Ryanair flights still operate in and out of Ireland during travel restrictions.

  • Passengers arriving in Ireland in course of duty and who hold a valid Annex 3 certificate (ensuring the availability of goods and essential services)a
  • Drivers of a heavy goods vehicle, airline pilots, aircrew, maritime master or maritime crew  
  • Passengers travelling to the State pursuant to an arrest warrant, extradition proceedings or other mandatory legal obligation
  • A member of An Garda Síochána or Defence Forces (or their equivalents from another state) and travelling to the State in course of duty
  • Travelling to the State for unavoidable, imperative and time-sensitive medical reasons and these reasons are certified by a registered medical practitioner or person with equivalent qualifications outside the State
  • Having been outside of the state to provide services to or perform the functions of an office holder (under any enactment or the Constitution) or a member of either house of the Oireachtas or the European Parliament
  • Diplomats and certain other categories of persons entitled to privileges and immunities in the State

You should be aware that requests for review can be based only on a limited number of grounds and that public health will remain a paramount consideration. See more here.
 

 

 

How to book mandatory hotel quarantine in Ireland.

hotel staff during quarantine in Ireland.

There is a dedicated website available to book mandatory hotel quarantine, if the room configuration that you require is not available please email  reservations@quarantinehotelsireland.ie

Book here 
 

 

 
Note: This post is correct at time of issue ( 22nd March 2020), but travel advice and updates are changing on a daily basis. It is important to check with the company / airline you are booking with before taking any steps to cancel or travel abroad. It is important to note that the list of designated states will be subject to change at short notice and passengers are required to check the list before travelling to Ireland, to be sure of their obligations.

See up to date information on www.gov.ie/quarantine.
 

 

 

Like this post? You might like:

Read: Latest travel updates due to Coronavirus

Read: Make sure to fill out Passenger Locator Forms before you travel overseas 

Read: Top 10 tips for travelling during Covid-19
 

Sarah

 

 

Travel Tips

What Is The EU Traffic Light System for Travel – My Step By Step Guide

airport travelling with masks

Confused by the new EU traffic light system for travel? My handy guide has all the categories, restrictions and quarantine rules.

On Sunday 8th November, the Irish Government implemented the new EU traffic light system for travel, and following a few amendments, it appears we finally have a workable system in place – well almost!

map of EU traffic light system for travel
The EU traffic light system approach provides for regions across the EU to be categorised as green, orange, red or grey, on the basis of the risk levels associated with COVID-19. A combined indicator map will be published each week by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, (ECDC), based on the 14-day cumulative notification rate, testing rate and testing positivity rates.
 

 

 
The ECDC traffic light system will be updated every Thursday, and the changes applied will come into effect for travel into Ireland from the following Monday. The proposed measures for arrivals from orange, red and green regions, once implemented, will be reviewed fortnightly. It is important to note not all countries are adopting the same timelines  – see more below.

how does the new EU traffic light system for travel work

What’s new in the EU traffic-light system for travel?

The categorisation of ‘regions’ instead of ‘countries’ is a significant one for Ireland, as popular hot spots such as the Canary Islands has seen significantly lower incidence rates than the rest of Spain.
 

 

 

 

 

 
The other significant change is in relation to testing. When the EU traffic light system was introduced, Ireland did not have testing requirements – this has now changed. From 16th January 2020 ALL passengers arriving in Ireland will need to produce a negative/not detected PCR test on arrival. In some cases it is possible to reduce quarantine times by obtaining a further test in Ireland five days after arrival – see more on this below.
 

 

 

Additional requirements have been introduced to combat the spread of the virus.

Arrivals into Ireland from ALL countries will have to produce a negative/not detected PCR test that was taken within 72 hours of arrival.  

All passengers are required to self-isolate at home for 14 days. Arrivals from South Africa and Brazil are subject to mandatory quarantine for 14 days, date when this will come into effect is yet to be announced. It is important that you check up to date entry requirements before you travel on gov.ie.

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
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Countries adopt different approaches within the EU traffic light system

mums weekend away

Currently many countries including Ireland require visitors to provide proof of a negative PCR test to be shown on arrival. This must be taken within 72 hours of departure. It is therefore vital that you check the requirements for the country you are travelling to in advance of travel. While Ireland updates its list of countries on the traffic light system every Monday, (taken from the ECDC Map published the previous Thursday), many other countries adopt different methods.

For instance, Spain updates its list every 15 days, giving tourists a window of certainty to make travel bookings, so that the countries will not change classification in two weeks. The results come into effect seven days later. 


 

 

 

What does this mean for Irish people travelling to Spain and The Canary Islands?

If you are travelling to Spain, including the Canary Islands from a red or grey region, you will need to produce confirmation of a negative PCR test taken within 72 hours of arrival.

As long as the Canary Islands remain a ‘red‘ region you will be required to restrict your movements for 14 days when you return to Ireland. You can take a PCR test five days after your return, and if this is negative, you will not have to restrict your movements for the remaining nine days – see more below.
 

 

 
If you are travelling to Spain, excluding the Canary Islands from an Amber / Orange region,  you are NOT required to provide a negative PCR test.

Requirements for entry to Spain from 11th January
However, The Canary Islands has a separate regulation in place. ALL visitors who are staying in tourist accommodation must produce a negative test taken in the 72 hours prior to arrival. This test can be an antigen or PCR test that detect SARS-COV-2 antigens with an accuracy of 97% and a sensitivity of over 80% as defined in their supporting documentation. Transcription Mediated Amplification (TMA) tests are also permitted.

For anyone looking to get a PCR test before you return home, the Canary Islands have published a list of clinics where these are possible here.

However, it is important to note that regulations are changing on a daily basis. Additional restrictions have been introduced in many countries due to the new faster transmitting strain that is prevalent in Europe. You should check with your airline / travel agent before flying.
 

 

 
There is also confusion over the governments current travel advice. The current public health advice is that there should be no non-essential international travel, however the Department of Foreign Affairs website states:

“Our current advice for travel to these countries (meaning those included in the ECDC map) is ‘exercise a high degree of caution’. Our general advice for any other overseas travel remains ‘avoid non-essential travel’ or in some cases, ‘do not travel’ ”
 

 

 
While the outlook for international travel still remains bleak in the short term, hopefully by adopting the new EU traffic-light system for travel, it should mean there will be more overseas travel in 2021, providing of course, that it is safe to do so.

travel in 2021 will be more accessible with EU traffic light system in place 

The new EU traffic light system for Ireland is as follows:

Regions are considered Green when:

The 14-day notification rate is lower than 25 cases per 100,000 of population and the test positivity rate is below 4%.

What restrictions apply?

Negative PCR test required for all visitors to Ireland. Persons arriving from EU green regions are not required to restrict their movements for 14 days.
 

 

 

Regions are considered Orange when:

The 14-day notification rate is lower than 50 cases per 100,000 of population and the test positivity rate is 4% or higher.

OR

The 14-day notification rate is between 25-150 cases per 100,000 and the test positivity rate is below 4%.

What restrictions apply?

Negative PCR test required for all visitors to Ireland. Persons arriving from EU amber regions are not required to restrict their movements for 14 days.

 

 

 

Regions are considered Red when:

The 14-day notification rate is 50 cases per 100,000 of population or higher and the test positivity rate is 4% or higher 

OR

The 14-day notification rate is higher than 150 cases per 100,000.

What restrictions apply?

Negative PCR test required for all visitors to Ireland. Travellers are required to restrict their movements for 14 days, except where travel is for essential purposes as outlined here.  It is possible to reduce quarantine times by taking a PCR test in Ireland, five days after arrival – see more below.

 

 

 

 

Regions are considered Grey when:

There is insufficient information provided, or if the testing rate is lower than 300 cases per 100,000 of population.

What restrictions apply?

Negative PCR test required for all visitors to Ireland. Travellers are required to restrict their movements for 14 days, except where travel is for essential purposes as outlined here. It is possible to reduce quarantine times by taking a PCR test in Ireland, five days after arrival – see more below.
 

 

 

If I take Covid-19 PCR test, can I eliminate or reduce quarantine times in Ireland?

travel updates due to coronavirus

The request to restrict movements for 14 days can be reduced for passengers arriving from a Red or Grey region, if they take a second PCR test in Ireland five days after arrival. If the test is negative/not detected, they will no longer have to restrict their movements – this reduces the quarantine time from 14 days to 5. If the test is positive, they will have to restrict their movements for 14 days.

 

A PCR test with certification is currently available from Randox at a cost of €99, and Tropical Medical Bureau from €120, as well as other suppliers throughout the country. 
 

 

 
Please note, there is currently a separate travel advisory for passengers arriving from UK and South Africa. All passengers, including those travelling for essential purposes are requested to self-isolate for 14 days. This can not be reduced by taking a further test after arrival in Ireland.
 

Read: Top 10 tips for travelling during Covid-19

Read: Make sure to fill out Passenger Locator Forms before you travel overseas 

How to get a refund if your flight is cancelled
 

 

 

Is there anything else I should know?

eu traffic light system for travel will see more Irish people travelling in 2021

Notwithstanding the above, travellers are required to adhere to the public health advice and not travel if they are symptomatic of Covid-19, a close contact of a confirmed case, or have been advised to restrict movements by doctors. Everyone arriving in Ireland excluding essential transport workers must complete a passenger locator form and are expected to following the Government’s current public health advice.

Read: Make sure to fill out Passenger Locator Forms before you travel overseas

Note: The above guide is researched from reputable websites, however, travel advice and updates are changing on a daily basis. It is important to check with the country and travel provider you are booking with before taking any steps to to travel abroad.

 

 

 

Sarah

Travel Tips

8 Things To Know If You Are Thinking of Travelling Overseas This Summer

plane and beach

Should I stay or should I go? A question I have been asked so many times lately! While this is a personal decision, hopefully my handy guide should help if you are thinking of travelling overseas this summer.

 

Thankfully the promise of a vaccine has many of us thinking of travelling overseas this summer. While we are still unsure as to when travel will resume to pre-covid levels, it is safe to assume that there will be some form of  travel happening this year. With this in  mind I have highlighted some top tips for travelling overseas below which might be useful.

Instagram

 

The fact that Ireland is allowing visitors into Ireland, even from high risk countries such as the USA, only ads to confusion about whether we should or should not travel. Hopefully this handy guide will help you decide whether to travel or stay at home. If you do decide on travelling overseas my 10 tips for travelling during Covid-19 will help you prepare for that journey.
 

 

 

1. Government advice against non-essential travel remains in place to countries outside Eu traffic light system.

government advise against overseas travel

The Irish government are currently advising against non-essential overseas travel to all countries except those that are on the EU traffic light system for travel.  The latest government travel advice as stated on the Department of Foreign Affairs website is as follows:

Ireland is implementing the EU ‘traffic lights’ approach to travel, which applies to countries in the EU / EEA. Our current advice for travel to these countries is ‘exercise a high degree of caution’. Our general advice for any other overseas travel remains ‘avoid non-essential travel’ or in some cases, ‘do not travel’.   

Read: What is the EU traffic light system for travel

Read: Latest travel updates due to Coronavirus
 

 

 

2. You need to quarantine for 14 days after returning into Ireland

quarantine at home after overseas travel

Currently if you travel abroad to ANY overseas country that is not a Green region on the EU traffic light system for travel, you should restrict your movements for 14 days on your return.  
 

 

 
Upon your return into Ireland you will be given a locater form to fill out, where you must provide contact details and information on where you will be restricting your movements. You may be contacted by government officials to check if you following their advice. You are able to produce negative PCR tests to reduce quarantine times – see more about this in my guide to the EU traffic light system for travel.
 

 

 

3. If you travel against government advice, your travel insurance will be invalidated

whether to travel overseas

If you travel against government advice,  it is important to note that your travel insurance will be invalidated. This could have serious financial repercussions if you travel outside of the EU.

However, if travelling within Europe, you can get the European Health Insurance card which will give you medical treatment for free, or at a reduced rate, in all European countries. See more here. Note, this will only cover you for medical treatment, and not for cancellation or curtailment, or for expenses occurred should you have to remain in a country due to a Covid-19 outbreak
 

 

 

4. Modern aircraft have air filtration systems similar to hospital operating theatres.

modern aircraft have HEPA air filtration systems on board

While the plane journey is just one of the components associated with travelling overseas, it is one that many are concerned with. However, it has been widely stated that the risk of catching an infection on an aircraft is typically lower than in crowded shopping centres or pubs. The main reason is that modern airplanes have cabin air filtration systems equipped with HEPA filters. HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air filters) have similar performance to those used in hospital operating theatres, and can capture 99% of the airborne microbes in the filtered air. You can read more on HEPA here.  
 

 

 

5. Check entry requirements of the country you wish to travel to.

whether to travel overseas this summer

If you are thinking of travelling overseas, is important to check the entry requirements to the country you are travelling to. With Covid-19 cases increasing all the time, countries are updating their entry requirements on a daily basis.

Some countries will require you to fill out Passenger Locator forms or health screening questionnaires online before you travel, (currently Greece require this to be filled out 24 hours in advance of travel), while others will accept paper forms on arrival.
 

 

 
Many European countries including Spain, require PCR Covid-19 tests to be taken 72 hours before arrival if you are coming from a country that they consider as high-risk, while other destinations such as Dubai and the Canary Islands require a negative PCR Covid-19 certificate for ALL international visitors. 

It is imperative that you check with the country you are travelling to before your departure to ensure that you are following the correct entry guidelines. 

Read: Make sure to fill out Passenger Locator Forms before you travel overseas  

Read: What is the EU traffic light system for travel – my step by step guide.

Read: My top tips for traveling during Covid-19
 

 

 

6. Countries have individual policies in tourist resorts.

beach time

It is important to check the guidelines in the resort / city that you are going to. Some holiday resorts and hotels will require you to pre-book pool times, beach space and even breakfast times. If there is a particular restaurant or theme park that you wish to visit, book it in advance to avoid disappointment. 

Masks are mandatory in many countries and you may get our temperature checked on arrival. Holiday hot spots like Spain and Portugal depend on tourism, and you will find that they will do all possible to ensure protocols are being obeyed.  
 

 

 

7. Flights are and will operate from Irish airports regardless of government advice and refunds wont be given.

ryanair

 If your flight operates, and government advice against non-essential travel is still in place, you are NOT entitled to a refund if you wish to cancel. Most airlines will allow you change dates for free, note Ryanair will only waive change fees on NEW bookings made since the 10th of June.

You may be able to claim on your travel insurance if you don’t want to travel, and government advice against non-essential travel is still in place to the country you are due to travel to, but best to check with your insurance provider, as all policies are different.
 

 

 

8. You ARE entitled to a refund if your flight is cancelled

flights cancelled

If your flight is cancelled, you are entitled to a refund under EU261. These are taking longer than usual to get processed, but you should receive one if you apply. Note EU 261 is an Air Passenger law, and applies to flights originating from Europe, not hotels, package holidays etc. 

Read: How to get a refund if your flight is cancelled
 

 

 
For more information on the latest travel updates, how best to secure a refund and travel insurance, check out the travel tips section of my website.

 

 
Sarah

The Travel Expert

 

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